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Poster Display session 1

5772 - Exploring the role of genes associated with familial cancer syndromes on the development of multiple primary tumors

Date

28 Sep 2019

Session

Poster Display session 1

Topics

Pathology/Molecular Biology

Tumour Site

Presenters

Atanaska Mitkova

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2019) 30 (suppl_5): v797-v815. 10.1093/annonc/mdz269

Authors

A.V. Mitkova1, R. Dodova1, M. Koleva2, A. Andreeva3, M. Tzekova-Chernopolska4, S. Giragosyan5, V.Y. Petkova6, I. Terziev7, S. Rangelov8, C. Slavov8, V. Mitev1, R.P. Kaneva1

Author affiliations

  • 1 Medical Chemistry And Biochemistry, Medical University Sofia, 1431 - Sofia/BG
  • 2 Medical Oncology, Serdika Hospital, 1303 - Sofia/BG
  • 3 Medical Oncology, University Hospital “Queen Joanna – ISUL”, 1527 - Sofia/BG
  • 4 Endoscopy, University Hospital “Queen Joanna – ISUL”, 1527 - Sofia/BG
  • 5 Medicalmedical Chemistry And Biochemistry, Medical University Sofia, 1431 - Sofia/BG
  • 6 Medical Chemistry And Biochemistry, Molecular Medicine Center, Medical University Sofia, 1431 - Sofia/BG
  • 7 Pathological Morphology, University Hospital “Queen Joanna – ISUL”, 1527 - Sofia/BG
  • 8 Clinic Of Urology With Specific Activity In Andrology, University Hospital “Queen Joanna – ISUL”, 1527 - Sofia/BG

Resources

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Abstract 5772

Background

Over the past decade an increase in the incidence and severity of multiple primary neoplasias has been observed. The main causes of multiple primary tumors (MPT) are genetic factors, environmental factors, infections with oncogenic viruses, etc. The aim of the current study was to explore the role of genes associated with familial cancers in MPT development.

Methods

The study included 12 MPT patients, of which 6 women with metahronous/synchronous breast and ovarian tumors; and 6 men who developed primary tumors with different localisation: bladder/bile ducts; rectum/pancreas; prostate/colon; prostate/sigma; sigma/stomach; palate/larynx+hypopharynx/tongue, respectively. Seventy five (9/12) of the patients had family history of cancer and 50% (6/12) early onset (<50y). Mutational screening was performed by NGS of a panel of 94 tumor-associated genes on MiSeq platform (Illumina).

Results

A total of 82 variants were found of which 18.3% were evaluated as clinically significant. Among selected variants 33.3% (5/15) were pathogenic, 13.3% (2/15) likely pathogenic and 53.3% (8/15) variants of uncertain significance (VUSs). Pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants were detected in the genes BRCA1 (20%), MLH1 (13.3%), BRCA2 (6.7%) and CDH1 (6.7%) while VUSs in PMS1, GPC3, DIS3L2, PRF1, STK11, DICER1, RET, and MSH6, respectively.

Conclusions

Overall, the genetic cause of MPT was found in 58.3% (7/12) of the patients. Further research is needed to evaluate the functional effect of all VUSs.

Clinical trial identification

Editorial acknowledgement

Grants D-71/03.05.2018/MU-Sofia; KP-06-OPR03/1719.12.2018/NSF; DUNK01-2/2009/NSF, MES Bulgaria.

Legal entity responsible for the study

Medical University of Sofia.

Funding

Medical University Sofia; National Science Fund, Ministry of Education and Science, Bulgaria. Grants D-71/03.05.2018/MU-Sofia; KP-06-OPR03/1719.12.2018/NSF; DUNK01-2/2009/NSF, MES Bulgaria.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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