Prospective randomized trial of standard antiemetic therapy with yoga versus standard antiemetic therapy alone for highly emetogenic chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in South Asian population

Date

20 Dec 2015

Session

Poster presentation 2

Presenters

Shankar Jakhar

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2015) 26 (suppl_9): 111-124. 10.1093/annonc/mdv531

Authors

S.L. Jakhar, G. Singh, T. Kothari, S. Narayan, A. Kapoor, T. Syiem, R. Purohit, H.S. Kumar, N. Sharma, A. Solanki

Author affiliations

  • Radiation Oncology, Acharya Tulsi Regional Cancer Treatment & Research Institute, 334003 - Bikaner/IN
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Resources

Aim/Background

Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting is one of the most distressing side effects of highly emetogenic chemotherapy regimens. There have been continuous efforts in the direction to control Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) by many investigators.

Methods

Randomly selected patients were those receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy regimen grouped into yoga and standard antiemetic therapy (n = 50) just prior to receiving chemotherapy and continued for the following days and other group (n = 50) received only the standard antiemetic agent. Both the groups were assessed, followed for acute and delayed onset of chemotherapy induced and anticipatory nausea and vomiting using RTOG grading for the same. We also assessed the Quality of Life of the patient using the FACT-G questionnaire.

Results

The median age group of the patients was 51 years with M:F 2:1, ECOG performance status 0/1,2 38% v/s 62%. In Yoga arm insignificant reduction in chemotherapy induced nausea (90% vs 78%, p = .35) and but significant reduction in vomiting (42% vs 22%, p = .01) was observed as compared to the standard antiemetics only arm. There was significant reduction in grade 2 and 3 nausea (84% vs 38% p < .01) and vomitting (14% vs 0% p < .01). Quality of Life is also significantly improved in the Yoga arm especially in ECOG 2 performance status.

Conclusions

This study concludes that Yoga along with standard antiemetic medication should be a part of the management plan for the cancer patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy.

Clinical trial identification

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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