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Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

4089 - Sarawak, Healthcare Professionals’ Perception Of Palliative Care at End Of Life

Date

22 Oct 2018

Session

Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

Topics

End-of-life Care

Tumour Site

Presenters

Cheng Cheah

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2018) 29 (suppl_8): viii548-viii556. 10.1093/annonc/mdy295

Authors

C.F. Cheah1, L.H.Y. Winnie1, A. Merriman2, N.I. Mohd Naseri1, S.W.Y. Chew3

Author affiliations

  • 1 Palliative Care Ward, Sarawak General Hospital, 93586 - Kuching/MY
  • 2 Palliative Care Ward, Hospice Uganda, 7757 - Kampala/UG
  • 3 Faculty Of Health Science, University of Bristol, BS8 1TH - Bristol/GB
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Resources

Abstract 4089

Background

Palliative care is fundamental to health and a basic human right. Healthcare professional are often the gatekeeper to palliative care for their patients, but there is great disparity in access to palliative care across Malaysia, and little knowledge about healthcare professionals’ perception towards palliative care at the end of life in Sarawak.

Methods

We surveyed all healthcare professionals who attended a palliative care seminar and talk by Prof Dr Anne Merriman, founder and director of policy and International program, Hospice Africa when she visited Kuching, Sarawak on 5th and 6th April 2018. Participants were asked to answer a questionnaire designed by Prof Merriman which comprises of 25 questions in trochotomous scale.

Results

A total of 186 responses were obtained, of which 68% (127) were doctors and 25% (46) were nurses. 80% (149) responded that they would like to die at home, while only 5% (9) preferred to pass away in hospital. 96% (179) wished to have family with them and 84% (157) wanted spiritual guidance at the end of life. Only 41% (76) reported that they were afraid to die, yet majority responded that they were afraid of a painful death (86%;160), a prolonged dying process (89%; 164) and troubling others (90%; 167). Less than 50% of healthcare professional surveyed felt that they were able to help patients achieved adequate pain control (43%;80) or support patients emotionally (42%;78), and majority (58%) reported lack of knowledge being the barrier. 95% (176) reported that they would like to attend more palliative care seminars and 92% (171) would like to have palliative care in their unit. 26% (48) responded that they would like it to be lawful to practice euthanasia, but only 15% (28) were prepared to actively practice euthanasia if it is legal.

Conclusions

Home is the preferred place of death even amongst healthcare professional in Sarawak. Lack of knowledge and professional training remains a major barrier to access of palliative care. The survey highlighted the need for palliative care training for local healthcare professional as well the need to develop hospice home care services in our State to provide better palliative care and end of life care for patients and families. Advocacy for advanced directives should be initiated.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

Winnie Hui Yee Ling.

Funding

Has not received any funding.

Editorial Acknowledgement

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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