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Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

5269 - FAT1 on YAP1-TEAD1 interaction augments oncogenic potential of GBM cells

Date

22 Oct 2018

Session

Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

Topics

Cancer Biology

Tumour Site

Central Nervous System Malignancies

Presenters

Yakhlesh Gupta

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2018) 29 (suppl_8): viii122-viii132. 10.1093/annonc/mdy273

Authors

Y. Gupta1, S.S. Shivajirao1, K. Irshad1, B. Dikshit1, T. Srivastava2, P.P. Chattopadhyay1, S. Sinha1, K. Chosdol1

Author affiliations

  • 1 Biochemistry, AIIMS, 110029 - New Delhi/IN
  • 2 Genetics, University of Delhi, 110021 - New Delhi/IN
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Resources

Abstract 5269

Background

Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor arising from supporting cells of the brain. We have recognized the oncogenic role of FAT1 gene in GBM, regulating inflammatory and hypoxic microenvironment of the tumor as well as migratory/invasive properties of tumor cells. In Drosophila, fat, the ortholog of FAT1, is known to regulate the Salvador-Warts-Hippo (SWH) pathway, but its role in human is not clear. Here, we have analyzed the effect of FAT1 on SWH pathway in glioma.

Methods

Glioma cell lines (U87MG, U373, A172, GOS3 and SW1088) were transfected with FAT1 specific siRNA/control siRNA and the expression of SWH pathway molecules was analysed by qPCR/western blot. Protein-protein interactions were analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) after over-expression of YAP1 (wild-type and mutated) and TEAD1 with and without FAT1 knockdown.

Results

The mRNA expression of FAT1 and SWH pathway molecules (MST1, LATS1, LATS2, YAP1 and TEAD1) was highest in U87MG cells followed by A172, U373MG and GOS3. After FAT1 knockdown, the mRNA expression of MST1 and BIRC2 were significantly decreased with no change in the levels of LATS1, LATS2, YAP1, TEAD1 and BIRC5. At protein level, increased YAP1 and phospho-YAP1 was observed after FAT1 knockdown with increased total as well as phospho-YAP1 in the cytoplasmic extract as compared to the nuclear extract. There was significant reduction in the interaction between YAP1 and TEAD1 in siFAT1 treated cells compared with siControl treated cells.

Conclusions

On FAT1 knockdown, we found (i) increased YAP1 protein level, which could be by increasing the protein stability as no change was observed at the mRNA level, (ii) increased phospho-YAP1 level as it relieves the inhibitory effect on YAP1 phosphorylation, (iii) it affects the sub-cellular localization of YAP1 by retaining YAP1 in the cytosol and thereby, (iv) decrease in the YAP1:TEAD1 interaction with decreased expression of their target gene, Birc2. This finding of the effect of FAT1 on YAP1 in GBM is novel with features pointing towards the oncogenic role of FAT1 by regulating YAP1 sub-cellular localization and co-transcriptional activity independent of SWH pathway.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi.

Funding

All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi.

Editorial Acknowledgement

N.A.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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