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Poster display session: Biomarkers, Gynaecological cancers, Haematological malignancies, Immunotherapy of cancer, New diagnostic tools, NSCLC - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, SCLC, Thoracic malignancies, Translational research

1419 - Elevated 70kDa heat shock protein (hsp70) and autophagy levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in women with a malignant breast mass

Date

20 Oct 2018

Session

Poster display session: Biomarkers, Gynaecological cancers, Haematological malignancies, Immunotherapy of cancer, New diagnostic tools, NSCLC - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, SCLC, Thoracic malignancies, Translational research

Topics

Cancer Biology

Tumour Site

Breast Cancer

Presenters

Aikaterini Athanasiou

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2018) 29 (suppl_8): viii14-viii57. 10.1093/annonc/mdy269

Authors

A.I. Athanasiou1, T. Orfanelli2, D. Lapolla3, E. Andreopoulou3, T.A. Moo4, J. Marti4, T. Cigler3, A.M. Bongiovanni1, S.S. Witkin1

Author affiliations

  • 1 Department Of Obgyn, Weill Cornell Medical College, 10065 - New York/US
  • 2 Department Of Obgyn, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 08901 - New Brunswick, NJ/US
  • 3 Department Of Medical Oncology, Weill Cornell Medicine/New York Presbyterian Hospital, 10065 - New York/US
  • 4 Department Of Surgical oncology, Weill Cornell Medicine/New York Presbyterian Hospital, 10065 - New York/US
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Resources

Abstract 1419

Background

PBMCs respond to adverse physiological conditions to maximize survival and to alleviate the threat. Hsp70 is produced to maintain protein function and activates an immune response. Autophagy is induced to provide sufficient nutrients in response to accelerated gene activation. We tested the hypothesis that PBMCS respond to the presence of a malignant breast mass by increasing production of hp70 and manifesting a higher level of autophagy.

Methods

In this pilot study seventy women had their breast mass evaluated by mammogram and/or breast ultrasound. A core biopsy and surgery was performed as indicated. PBMCs were isolated from peripheral blood, lysed and intracellular levels of hsp70 and p62 (a measure of autophagy) were quantitated by ELISA. Extracellular hsp70 in plasma was also measured. Differences in lab measurements between women with a diagnosis of a benign or malignant breast mass were determined. All assays were performed by personnel blinded to the clinical data.

Results

A breast malignancy was diagnosed in 42 women while 28 had a benign lesion. Plasma hsp70 levels were higher in women with a malignant lesion (p = 0.03). PBMCs from 46 women were available for analysis. Mean hsp70 levels were higher in PBMCs from 38 women with a malignant lesion than in 8 women with a benign breast mass (p = 0.04). The PBMC p62 levels were higher in women with a benign breast lesion than in those with a malignant breast mass (p < 0.0001). Since p62 is inversely related to the level of autophagy this indicates that autophagy is higher in PBMCs from women with a malignant breast lesion. There was no difference in the concentration of hsp70 or p62 between women with different histological types or stage of breast cancer.

Conclusions

Detection of elevated levels of hsp70 and autophagy in PBMCs, and higher plasma hsp70 levels, may differentiate between women with a malignant or benign breast lesion. Further studies on a larger sample are needed to confirm if the extent of autophagy and hsp70 induction in PBMCs may be of value in the preoperative triage of women with a breast mass.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

Weill Cornell Medicine.

Funding

Weill Cornell Medicine.

Editorial Acknowledgement

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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