Oops, you're using an old version of your browser so some of the features on this page may not be displaying properly.

MINIMAL Requirements: Google Chrome 24+Mozilla Firefox 20+Internet Explorer 11Opera 15–18Apple Safari 7SeaMonkey 2.15-2.23

Poster display session: Basic science, Endocrine tumours, Gastrointestinal tumours - colorectal & non-colorectal, Head and neck cancer (excluding thyroid), Melanoma and other skin tumours, Neuroendocrine tumours, Thyroid cancer, Tumour biology & pathology

5722 - Early detection of colorectal cancer using breath biomarkers: Preliminary study

Date

21 Oct 2018

Session

Poster display session: Basic science, Endocrine tumours, Gastrointestinal tumours - colorectal & non-colorectal, Head and neck cancer (excluding thyroid), Melanoma and other skin tumours, Neuroendocrine tumours, Thyroid cancer, Tumour biology & pathology

Topics

Cancer Prevention

Tumour Site

Colon and Rectal Cancer

Presenters

Georgia Woodfield

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2018) 29 (suppl_8): viii150-viii204. 10.1093/annonc/mdy281

Authors

G. Woodfield1, I. Belluomo1, H. Panesar1, G.P. Lin1, P. Boshier1, A. Romano1, J. Martin2, C. Groves3, B. Saunders4, W. Atkin1, G.B. Hanna1

Author affiliations

  • 1 Department Of Surgery And Cancer, Imperial College London, W21NY - London/GB
  • 2 Gastroenterology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, W6 8RF - London/GB
  • 3 Gastroenterology, St George's Healthcare NHS Trust, SW170QT - London/GB
  • 4 Gastroenterology, St Mark's Hospital, HA1 3UJ - London/GB
More

Resources

Abstract 5722

Background

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the 2nd most common UK cause of cancer death. The bowel cancer screening programme (BCSP) has saved lifes through early cancer diagnosis. However, it only targets those aged 60-74, and leads to many potentially unnecessary colonoscopies. A breath test could be used as a more specific non-invasive screening tool, or to triage/reassure symptomatic patients. Prior studies have shown promising results using exhaled propanal for detecting CRC (96% sensitivity/76% specificity). The Colorectal BReath Analysis (COBRA) study aims to determine the diagnostic accuracy of breath volatile organic compounds for detecting CRC, first by analysing breath of known colorectal cancer patients, then by testing the resultant diagnostic model on a prospective BCSP population, target 2000 patients.

Methods

Clinical data was collected from patients attending for colonoscopies or CRC surgery across 4 London centres July 2017 to May 2018. Exhaled breath (500mls) was collected using the ReCIVA™ breath sampling device, onto thermal desorption tubes. Analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry and proton transfer reaction (PTR) mass spectrometry identified and quantified breath compounds.

Results

426 patients were recruited for this preliminary dataset. 80 samples were excluded due to inadequate colonoscopies, instrument faults or inadequate quality measures. This left 346 patients; 20 with known CR adenocarcinoma were sampled pre-operatively, the rest from endoscopy units pre-colonoscopy. All were nil by mouth having had bowel preparation. Colonoscopy results showed: 29 CR adenocarcinoma, 84 normal, 35 benign pathology, 31 IBD, 83, 20 and 57 with low, intermediate and high risk polyps, and 7 with polyposis syndromes. PTR data analysis so far indicates that there are discriminatory breath compounds between pathology groups, but analysis is ongoing to investigate potential confounders.

Conclusions

Further analysis of this preliminary dataset is expected to reveal compounds of interest for colorectal cancer diagnosis. The true diagnostic accuracy of breath testing is expected to be revealed once these compounds are tested on the larger population dataset for COBRA (recruitment ongoing since January 2018).

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

Imperial College London.

Funding

Imperial College Charity - Rosetrees.

Editorial Acknowledgement

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

This site uses cookies. Some of these cookies are essential, while others help us improve your experience by providing insights into how the site is being used.

For more detailed information on the cookies we use, please check our Privacy Policy.

Customise settings
  • Necessary cookies enable core functionality. The website cannot function properly without these cookies, and you can only disable them by changing your browser preferences.