Oops, you're using an old version of your browser so some of the features on this page may not be displaying properly.

MINIMAL Requirements: Google Chrome 24+Mozilla Firefox 20+Internet Explorer 11Opera 15–18Apple Safari 7SeaMonkey 2.15-2.23

Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

4928 - Anticancer therapy at the end of life of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer patients

Date

22 Oct 2018

Session

Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

Topics

Therapy

Tumour Site

Breast Cancer;  Prostate Cancer;  Colon and Rectal Cancer

Presenters

Vitali Heidt

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2018) 29 (suppl_8): viii548-viii556. 10.1093/annonc/mdy295

Authors

V. Heidt1, K. Hermes-Moll2, K. Blaschke3, V. Lappe3, P. Ihle3, I. Schubert3, W. Baumann1

Author affiliations

  • 1 -, WINHO GmbH, 50676 - Cologne/DE
  • 2 -, WINHO GmbH, Cologne/DE
  • 3 Pmv Forschungsgruppe, Universität Köln, Köln/DE
More

Resources

Abstract 4928

Background

The study addresses growing concerns regarding aggressive cancer treatment at the end of life. The extent of anticancer treatment at the end of life of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer patients aged 60 years and older as well as its development in recent years is investigated.

Methods

Routine data of the statutory health insurance company AOK Hessen in Germany (approx. 1.4 million assured persons in 2014) for 2008-2013 are analyzed. Cancer patients are identified using ICD-10 codes: breast (C50), prostate (C61), and colorectal cancer (C18-21), and validated using inpatient and outpatient diagnoses. The last year before death is examined in 90-days periods and, in addition, the last 90 days in 30-days periods.

Results

Key results are that cancer patients aged 80 years and older less often receive anticancer therapy at the end of life (e.g. women with breast cancer in 2013: 20% in the last 90 days, 6% in the last 30 days before death) than patients aged 60-69 (56% and 29%) or 70-79 (46% and 18%). There is no clear development toward a reduction in anticancer treatment in women with breast cancer at the end of life between 2008 and 2013. The number of anticancer therapies at the end of life in men with prostate cancer aged 60-69 years reduced between 2008 and 2013, especially in the second (2008: 56%, 2013: 49%) and third 90-days period from last (2008: 57%, 2013: 45%) and reached the same level as patients aged 70-79. There are differences in the number of anticancer therapies between men and women with colorectal cancer at the end of life. Especially, women aged 80 and older with colorectal cancer rarely receive anticancer therapy in the year before death (in 2013: 5% in the last 90 days, 1% in the last 30 days before death) compared to men (12% and 5%).

Conclusions

These results support increased sensitivity regarding anticancer treatment at the end of life. To further investigate these results, studies should include cancer staging, general health status, and patient reported outcomes such as quality of life.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

WINHO GmbH & Universität Köln / PMV Forschungsgruppe.

Funding

Zentralinstitut für die kassenärztliche Versorgung.

Editorial Acknowledgement

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

This site uses cookies. Some of these cookies are essential, while others help us improve your experience by providing insights into how the site is being used.

For more detailed information on the cookies we use, please check our Privacy Policy.

Customise settings
  • Necessary cookies enable core functionality. The website cannot function properly without these cookies, and you can only disable them by changing your browser preferences.