Oops, you're using an old version of your browser so some of the features on this page may not be displaying properly.

MINIMAL Requirements: Google Chrome 24+Mozilla Firefox 20+Internet Explorer 11Opera 15–18Apple Safari 7SeaMonkey 2.15-2.23

Worldwide trends in survival from adult glioma 2000-2014 (CONCORD-3): impact of morphology.

Date

22 Oct 2018

Session

Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

Presenters

Fabio Girardi

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2018) 29 (suppl_8): viii122-viii132. 10.1093/annonc/mdy273

Authors

F. Girardi, V. Di Carlo, A. Bonaventure, C. Allemani, M.P. Coleman, . CONCORD Working Group

Author affiliations

  • Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, WC1E 7HT - London/GB
More

Resources

Background

The CONCORD programme initiated world-wide surveillance of trends in population-based cancer survival in 2015. The third cycle (CONCORD-3) covered 18 cancers, including brain tumours. Data for 656,659 adults (15-99 years) diagnosed with a brain tumour were provided by 286 registries in 59 countries. For adults diagnosed during 2010-2014, 5-year net survival from all brain tumours combined varied between 15% and 42%. We will present detailed comparison of survival trends for gliomas defined by anatomic location, morphology and WHO grade.

Methods

We will present the numbers of adults diagnosed with a glioma and the sub-type distribution by continent. We will estimate net survival up to 5 years, using the unbiased Pohar Perme estimator. Net survival is the probability that patients survive their cancer until a given time since diagnosis, after controlling for competing risks of death (background mortality) by age, sex, country and calendar year.

Results

Data were obtained for 545,184 adults. Glioblastoma was the most common morphology (57%). Astrocytic, oligodendroglial and oligo-astrocytic tumours specified as WHO grade I-III made up 21% of all gliomas, while glioma not otherwise specified (NOS) and astrocytoma NOS made up 15%. Rarer tumours, such as oligodendroglioma, fibrillary astrocytoma, pilocytic astrocytoma, mixed glioma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma and anaplastic astrocytoma made up less than 10% of gliomas in all continents. The frequency of glioblastoma was 58% or higher in Europe, North America and Oceania, 53% in Africa and around 45% in Asia and Central and South America. The frequency of astrocytoma NOS was lowest in Europe, North America and Oceania (below 9%) and highest in Central and South America (22%).

Conclusions

The distribution of gliomas varies around the world. The differential was the frequency of unspecified morphologies, which may be partly attributable to diagnostic capacity. We will assess the extent to which disparities in morphology contribute to worldwide variation in survival from adult brain tumours. When comprehensive survival analyses are available, this project is expected to become the reference for international comparison of brain tumour survival, to help inform national cancer control plans.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Funding

Children with Cancer UK.

Editorial Acknowledgement

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

Resources from the same session

Working arrangements after cancer diagnosis: who, what, when and how?

Presenter: Caroline Alleaume

Session: Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

Resources:

Abstract

VOYAGER: An open-label, randomised, Phase 3 study of avapritinib vs regorafenib in patients (pts) with locally advanced (adv) metastatic or unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

Presenter: Sebastian Bauer

Session: Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

Resources:

Abstract

This site uses cookies. Some of these cookies are essential, while others help us improve your experience by providing insights into how the site is being used.

For more detailed information on the cookies we use, please check our Privacy Policy.

Customise settings