Oops, you're using an old version of your browser so some of the features on this page may not be displaying properly.

MINIMAL Requirements: Google Chrome 24+Mozilla Firefox 20+Internet Explorer 11Opera 15–18Apple Safari 7SeaMonkey 2.15-2.23

Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

926 - Group Pre-Chemotherapy Education: Improving patient experience through education and empowerment

Date

22 Oct 2018

Session

Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

Presenters

Kirsty McIntyre

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2018) 29 (suppl_8): viii603-viii640. 10.1093/annonc/mdy300

Authors

K. McIntyre, R. Blackwood, V. Riley, L. Carballo, H. Plant, T. Marler-Hausen

Author affiliations

  • Chemotherapy Daycare, University College Hospital London, WC1E - AG/GB
More

Resources

Abstract 926

Background

Patients are not always adequately prepared to start chemotherapy. Information given may not be consistent and little education is given on how patients can be empowered to support themselves to manage side effects of treatment. A pre-chemotherapy education session delivered in a group setting was developed to improve and standardise the information given to patients prior to starting treatment and to reduce the amount of time delivering one to one pre-chemotherapy sessions.

Methods

The project was led by senior cancer nurses who identified four themes that became the focus of the education session; safety, patient experience, process and patient empowerment. The education session was piloted for gynaecology patients before expanding to all new referrals. We collected both qualitative and quantitative data pre and post the sessions using a 0-10 rating scale to evaluate how informed, how worried and how confident patients felt about their prospective treatment.

Results

Since April 2017 we have had a total of 211 attendees, inc relatives which is approx 25% of new patient referrals to Chemotherapy Daycare. When asked about how informed patients felt about their treatment plan they had an average score of 6.7[SD2.5] before the session, increasing by 28% to 8.6[SD1.6] afterwards. When asked about how worried patients felt about their treatment they had an average score of 6.3[SD2.7], decreasing by 19% to 5.1[SD2.8] afterwards. When asked how confident patients felt, they had an average score of 6[SD2.4], increasing by 16% to 7[SD2.3] afterwards. Analysis of the qualitative data showed positive feedback but also highlighted problems with patients understanding the process to treatment.

Conclusions

The education session is a useful way of providing information to patients and improves their confidence. Patients on average become less worried after attending the session although some patients felt more worried, likely to be because they were confronted with the reality of their situation. The main challenges were to engage the clinical teams as this was a change in practice. In response to concerns around travelling distance and numerous appointments we are developing a patient education video for patients to watch at their convenience.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

Tom Marler-Hausen.

Funding

Has not received any funding.

Editorial Acknowledgement

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

This site uses cookies. Some of these cookies are essential, while others help us improve your experience by providing insights into how the site is being used.

For more detailed information on the cookies we use, please check our Privacy Policy.

Customise settings
  • Necessary cookies enable core functionality. The website cannot function properly without these cookies, and you can only disable them by changing your browser preferences.