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Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

3884 - Cancer care-related social media (SM) and internet usage differences between adolescents and young adults (AYA), adults and elderly patients with cancer.

Date

22 Oct 2018

Session

Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

Presenters

Lawson Eng

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2018) 29 (suppl_8): viii603-viii640. 10.1093/annonc/mdy300

Authors

L. Eng1, J. Bender2, K. Hueniken3, S. Kassirian3, D. Yang3, L. Mitchell4, C.B. Paulo5, A. Magony3, E.C. Smith3, M. Liang3, M..C. Brown3, W. Xu3, S.M.H. Alibhai6, G. Liu3, A. Gupta7

Author affiliations

  • 1 Medical Oncology And Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, M5G 2M9 - Toronto/CA
  • 2 Department Of Epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Toronto/CA
  • 3 Department Of Medical Oncology And Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, M5G 2M9 - Toronto/CA
  • 4 Adolescent And Young Adult Program, Hospital for Sick Chidlren, Toronto/CA
  • 5 Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, M5G 2M9 - Toronto/CA
  • 6 Geriatrics And General Internal Medicine, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto/CA
  • 7 Department Of Hematology And Oncology, Hospital for Sick Chidlren, Toronto/CA
More

Resources

Abstract 3884

Background

Internet and SM provide important information and support to cancer patients. Evaluating age-related differences on how patients use these resources is important as it can impact decision-making. Here, we evaluated associations between patients’ age, confidence in computer-use, and use of Internet/SM for cancer care.

Methods

Cancer patients completed a cross-sectional survey of cancer-related SM/Internet use and self-confidence using these resources. Multivariable logistic regression evaluated factors associated with Internet/SM use.

Results

Among 320 patients, 127 were AYA (age 18-39), 127 were adult (40-64) and 66 were elderly (65+). Most (>95%) had a smartphone/tablet/computer and used the Internet daily. Compared to AYA, non-AYA were less likely (P < 0.001) to own a data plan (77% vs 92%), have a SM account (72% vs 95%) or feel confident using computers (76% vs 98%). 75% used Internet and 43% used SM for cancer care information and support; 37% felt confident using online information for decision-making. AYA were more likely than non-AYA to use the Internet (aOR = 1.60, 95%CI [0.93-2.81], P = 0.09) and SM (aOR = 1.75 [1.04-2.95], P = 0.04) for cancer care. Adults were more likely than elderly patients to use the internet for cancer care (aOR = 3.10 [1.56-6.25], P = 0.001), while no difference was seen in their SM use for cancer care (P = 0.79). Confident computer users were more likely to use Internet (aOR = 5.36 [2.67-11.00], P < 0.001) and SM (aOR = 4.61 [1.98-12.14], P < 0.001) for cancer care and were more confident using this information in decision-making (aOR = 5.12 [1.92-17.81], P < 0.001). Age was not associated with self-confidence using online information for decision-making (P > 0.10).

Conclusions

Despite higher use of internet/SM for cancer care, AYA did not feel more self-confident evaluating online cancer information. Confidence in computer use was associated internet/SM usage and confidence evaluating online information. Patient education programs should focus on improving patients’ confidence in using online resources so they can better evaluate online information for cancer care.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

Princess Margaret Cancer Centre - University Health Network.

Funding

Has not received any funding.

Editorial Acknowledgement

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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