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Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

3069 - A pilot study of exercise intervention in patients with metastatic cancer: feasibility, safety, and patient reported outcome

Date

22 Oct 2018

Session

Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care

Presenters

Joo-Hwan Park

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2018) 29 (suppl_8): viii603-viii640. 10.1093/annonc/mdy300

Authors

J. Park1, E.Y. Kim2, K.D. Park3, S.M. Kang4, H. Ahn1, Y.S. Kim1, I. Park1, S.J. Sym1, D.B. Shin1

Author affiliations

  • 1 Medical Oncology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, 405-760 - Incheon/KR
  • 2 Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, 405-760 - Incheon/KR
  • 3 Rehabilitation Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, 405-760 - Incheon/KR
  • 4 Pulmonology And Allergy, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Namdong-gu - Incheon/KP
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Resources

Abstract 3069

Background

Skeletal muscle loss is a central component of cancer cachexia syndrome and is a poor prognostic factor in patients with cancer. We investigated prevalence of sarcopenia and the feasibility of exercise intervention in patients with newly diagnosed advanced solid cancer.

Methods

Between July 2017 and February 2018, consecutive patients with newly diagnosed advanced solid cancer were enrolled to our prospective cohort. Sarcopenia was defined as the third lumbar vertebra(L3) muscle index of less than 55 cm2/m2 for men and of less than 39 cm2/m2 for women. Patients were recruited to participate in a 12-week, combined resistance and aerobic exercise program consisted of supervised, hospital-based (2x/week) and home-based training (3x/week), during the first-line palliative chemotherapy. The primary endpoint were feasibility and safety of the exercise intervention. Pre- and post- exercise intervention skeletal muscle mass by bioelectrical impedance analysis(BIA) and patients’ quality of life questionnaires were measured and compared.

Results

Among 76 patients enrolled in the prospective cohort, sarcopenia was present in 58 (76.3%) patients (94.3% in men, 34.8% in women). Nineteen patients was enrolled in the exercise program, however 5 patients withdrew consent before commencement. Reasons for withdrawal were health concern (n = 2), distance to the hospital (n = 1) and unspecified (n = 2). The completion rate of the 12-week exercise program was 78.6% (11/14). Disease progression (n = 2) was the main reason for early discontinuation. The adherence rate of the supervised exercise session was 78.1% (207/265) and there was no adverse event associated with the exercise training. Among participants in the exercise program, there was no significant change in skeletal muscle index from baseline to post-intervention (mean, 9.4±1.3kg/m2 vs 9.4±1.2kg/m2, p = 0.982). FACIT-fatigue scale was non-significantly improved after the exercise intervention (mean, 35.2±10.4 vs 38.2±9.8, p = 0.635).

Conclusions

Exercise interventions appear to be feasible and safe in patients with advanced solid cancer and might have a role of preventing skeletal muscle loss without fatigue exacerbation during palliative chemotherapy.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

Gachon University Gil Medical Center.

Funding

National R&D Program for Cancer Control, Ministry of Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (grant no. HA17C0045).

Editorial Acknowledgement

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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