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Poster display session

4218 - Breast cancer specific survival (BCSS) in young woman

Date

10 Sep 2017

Session

Poster display session

Topics

Cancers in Adolescents and Young Adults (AYA);  Bioethical Principles and GCP;  Breast Cancer

Presenters

Steven Shak

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2017) 28 (suppl_5): v511-v520. 10.1093/annonc/mdx385

Authors

S. Shak1, M. Roberts2, D. Miller1, A. Kurian3, V. Petkov2

Author affiliations

  • 1 Translational Sciences, Genomic Health Inc, 94063 - Redwood City/US
  • 2 Cancer Control And Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda/US
  • 3 Departments Of Medicine (oncology) And Of Health Research & Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, 94305 - Stanford/US
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Resources

Abstract 4218

Background

BC at a young age is generally associated with poor prognosis, more aggressive treatment, long-term toxicities, and unique psychosocial concerns. Little data is available on outcomes defined by molecular profiles. We characterized BCSS in female patients (pts)

Methods

RS results were provided electronically to SEER (US population based cancer registries) per their linkage methods (Petkov et al, npj Breast Cancer, 2016). Eligible pts were diagnosed (Jan 2004 - Dec 2012) with N0 HR+ BC, and had no prior malignancy or multiple tumors. BCSS was analyzed for female pts

Results

1,761 of 7,186 pts

Conclusions

This large population-based study of N0 HR+ HER2- BC indicates not all young women have aggressive tumor biology and poor prognosis. Nearly half (47%) of women

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

National Cancer Institute

Funding

National Cancer Institute

Disclosure

S. Shak: Full-time employee of Genomic Health and a shareholder of Genomic Health. D. Miller: Employee of Genomic Health. All other authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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