Highlighting differences in education satisfaction and professional development between medical and clinical oncologists in Europe. A European survey conducted by the Hellenic Group of Young Oncologists (HeGYO)

Date

09 Oct 2016

Session

Poster display

Presenters

Eleni Aravantinou Fatorou

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2016) 27 (6): 474-482. 10.1093/annonc/mdw387

Authors

E. Aravantinou Fatorou1, G. Papaxoinis2, K. Kamposioras2, A. Korogiannos2, V. Papadopoulos2, G. Lazaridis2, M. Nikolaou2, E. Voulgaris2, E. Bournakis2, K. Tsigaridas2, M. Liontos2, E. Pantavou2, N. Chatzifoti2, P. Zaxaropoulou2, I. Varthalitis2, A. Athanasiadis2, N.G. Tsoukalas2

Author affiliations

  • 1 Under The Auspices Of The Hellenic Society Of Medical Oncology (hesmo), Hellenic Group of Young Oncologists (HeGYO), 11475 - Athens/GR
  • 2 Under The Auspices Of The Hellenic Society Of Medical Oncology (hesmo), Hellenic Group of Young Oncologists (HeGYO), Athens/GR
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Resources

Background

Advances in Oncology research and the increasing knowledge of cancer therapeutics render continuous education an absolute necessity for oncologists. Aim of this study was to reveal any differences between Medical and Clinical Oncologists in educational opportunities and continuous professional development.

Methods

Residents and specialized medical (MedOncs) and clinical oncologists (ClinOncs) from Europe were invited to complete a comprehensive forty multiple-choice web-questionnaire between February 20015 and January 2016. The study was kindly endorsed by scientific organizations such as ESMO YOC, ECCO, ESO and HeSMO.

Results

These are the final results of a subanalysis from 226 participants. (69% MedOncs, 31% ClinOncs). More MedOncs compared to ClinOncs choose their specialty because they consider it challenging and more available for training (85.3 vs. 68.6%, p = 0.006 and 22.9 vs. 10.9%, p = 0.025 respectively). MedOncs reported being more frequently completely satisfied (19.2 vs. 14.3%) and satisfied (35.3 vs. 24.3%) with the accordance of their training to the global curriculum (p = 0.002). More ClinOncs compared to MedOncs are completely satisfied from the academic tasks and opportunities provided by their National Oncology Society (24.3 vs. 11.5%, p = 0.011). MedOncs reported higher participation in scientific activities such as co-authoring in a medical book (43.6 vs. 22.9%, p = 0.003), participating in an Editorial Board (18.6 vs. 7.1, p = 0.027), giving lectures in congresses (53.2 vs. 24.3%, p 

Conclusions

It is apparent that oncologists are highly thriving for education. More educational activities and career opportunities should be offered for both Medical and Clinical Oncologists. The differences highlighted in this survey need to be validated in a bigger cohort of oncologists.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

Hellenic Group of Young Oncologists (HeGYO, http://www.hesmo.gr/en/gyon/group), under the auspices of the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncology (HeSMO, http://www.hesmo.gr/en)

Funding

Hellenic Group of Young Oncologists (HeGYO, http://www.hesmo.gr/en/gyon/group), under the auspices of the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncology (HeSMO, http://www.hesmo.gr/en)

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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