Oops, you're using an old version of your browser so some of the features on this page may not be displaying properly.

MINIMAL Requirements: Google Chrome 24+Mozilla Firefox 20+Internet Explorer 11Opera 15–18Apple Safari 7SeaMonkey 2.15-2.23

Do MDR1 & CYP3A5 genetic polymorphisms influence the risk of cytogenetic relapse in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia on imatinib therapy?

Date

08 Oct 2016

Session

Poster Display

Presenters

Harivenkatesh Natarajan

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2016) 27 (6): 313-327. 10.1093/annonc/mdw375

Authors

H. Natarajan1, L. Kumar2, S. Bakhshi2, A. Sharma2, M. Kabra3, T. Velpandian1, A. Gogia2, S. Shastri4, Y.K. Gupta1

Author affiliations

  • 1 Clinical Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, 110029 - New Delhi/IN
  • 2 Medical Oncology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi/IN
  • 3 Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi/IN
  • 4 Genetics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi/IN
More

Resources

Background

Genetic polymorphisms in the genes coding for imatinib transporters & metabolizing enzymes might be responsible for marked inter-individual pharmacokinetic variability seen with imatinib. Whether these polymorphisms influence the risk of cytogenetic relapse in patients with CML on imatinib therapy is unknown.

Methods

Patients with chronic phase CML on imatinib therapy & have completed 5 years of follow-up were enrolled. The following single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped- C1236T, C3435T, G2677T & G2677A in MDR1 gene and A6986G in CYP3A5 gene. Genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP method & validated by direct gene sequencing. Plasma trough levels of imatinib were measured using LC-MS/MS. Cytogenetic relapse was defined as the presence of Philadelphia chromosome positive metaphases in conventional bone marrow cytogenetic study in patients who had already achieved complete cytogenetic response.

Results

A total of 104 chronic phase CML patients (52 cases with cytogenetic relapse & 52 controls without cytogenetic relapse) were included. Mean age at diagnosis was 36 years. Among the SNPs genotyped, statistically significant difference in the frequency of various genotypes was seen for MDR1-C1236T & C3435T polymorphisms, between the patients with & without relapse (table 1). Patients with CC genotype for MDR1-C1236T polymorphism were at a significantly higher risk of relapse [OR = 4.382, 95%CI (1.145, 16.774), p = 0.022], while those with TT genotype for MDR1-C3435T polymorphism had a significantly lower risk of relapse [OR = 0.309, 95%CI (0.134, 0.708), p = 0.005]. Patients with cytogenetic relapse had lower trough levels of imatinib compared to those without relapse (table).

Frequency of genotypes and trough levels of imatinib in patients with and without cytogenetic relapse

SNP Genotype Patients with cytogenetic relapse (n = 52) Patients without cytogenetic relapse (n = 52) P value
CYP3A5- A6986G AA 8 (57%) 6 (43%) 0.492
AG 23 (55%) 19 (45%)
GG 21 (44%) 27 (56%)
MDR1-C1236T CC 11 (79%) 3 (21%) 0.024
CT 34 (50%) 34 (50%)
TT 7 (32%) 15 (68%)
MDR1- C3435T CC 11 (73%) 4 (27%) 0.010
CT 28 (57%) 21 (43%)
TT 13 (32%) 27 (68%)
MDR1-G2677T/A GG 7 (70%) 3 (30%) 0.453
GT 23 (52%) 21 (48%)
TT 16 (40%) 24 (60%)
TA 4 (57%) 3 (43%)
GA 2 (67%) 1 (33%)
Trough levels of Imatinib (ng/mL) 1551.4 ± 1324.1 2154.2 ± 1358.3 0.041

Conclusions

C1236T & C3435T genetic polymorphisms in MDR1 gene significantly influence the risk of cytogenetic relapse in patients with CML. Genotyping of MDR1 gene may be considered in patients with CML to individualize the therapy & optimize the outcomes.

Clinical trial identification

Not Applicable

Legal entity responsible for the study

All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

Funding

All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (Institute funding)

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

Resources from the same session

This site uses cookies. Some of these cookies are essential, while others help us improve your experience by providing insights into how the site is being used.

For more detailed information on the cookies we use, please check our Privacy Policy.

Customise settings