Decreased body mass index (BMI) associates with impaired survival from diagnosis of brain metastases in lung cancer patients: analysis of 624 patients

Date

09 Oct 2016

Session

Poster display

Presenters

Eva Masel

Citation

Annals of Oncology (2016) 27 (6): 497-521. 10.1093/annonc/mdw390

Authors

E.K. Masel1, A.S. Berghoff2, U. Dieckmann3, G. Widhalm4, B. Gatterbauer4, P. Birner5, R. Bartsch2, S. Schur1, H.H. Watzke6, C. Zielinski7, M. Preusser7

Author affiliations

  • 1 Clinical Division Of Palliative Care, Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Medical University of Vienna), 1090 - Vienna/AT
  • 2 Department Of Oncology, Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Medical University of Vienna), 1090 - Vienna/AT
  • 3 Department Of Radiotherapy, Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Medical University of Vienna), 1090 - Vienna/AT
  • 4 Department Of Neurosurgery, Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Medical University of Vienna), 1090 - Vienna/AT
  • 5 Department Of Pathology, Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Medical University of Vienna), 1090 - Vienna/AT
  • 6 Clinical Division Of Palliative Care, Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Medical University of Vienna), 1090 Vienna - Vienna/AT
  • 7 Clinical Division Of Oncology, Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Medical University of Vienna), 1090 - Vienna/AT
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Background

Body Mass Index (BMI) has been documented as a prognostically relevant factor in several cancer types including lung cancer, but has not been investigated in brain metastases (BM). We investigated prognostic relevance of BMI in a large institutional cohort of patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer BM.

Methods

Patients with newly diagnosed BM from lung cancer treated at the Medical University of Vienna between 1990 and 2013 were identified from a BM database. BMI at diagnosis of BM was calculated by the formula body weight in kilogram/body height in m2 and defined as underweight (BMI 

Results

624 patients (male 401/624 (64.3%); female 223/624 (35.7%); median age of 61 (range 33-88) were available for further analysis. Lung cancer subtype was non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 17/622 (66.8%), small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in 205/624 (32.9%) and unknown in 2/624 (0.3%) patients. 313/624 (50.2%) patients had normal BMI, 272/624 (43.5%) patients were overweight and 39/624 (6.3%) patients were underweight. Underweight patients had significantly shorter median overall survival times (3 months) compared to patients with normal BMI (7 months) and overweight patients (8 months; p 

Conclusions

Underweight is infrequent at diagnosis of BM in lung cancer patients, but strongly and independently associates with an unfavourable prognosis. Our data highlight the importance of addressing cachexia in the palliative treatment of patients with lung cancer BM. Specific interventions may help to improve patient outcomes.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

Medical University of Vienna

Funding

Medical University of Vienna

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

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