Mediterranean diet components are negatively associated with advanced colorectal polyps in a population-based case-control study

Date 28 June 2017
Event ESMO World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer 2017
Session ESMO World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer 2017
Topics Gastrointestinal Cancers
Colon and Rectal Cancer
Presenter Shira Zelver-Sagi
Citation Annals of Oncology (2017) 28 (suppl_3): iii137-iii149. 10.1093/annonc/mdx262
Authors S. Zelver-Sagi, M. Webb, D. Ivankovsky, D. Margalit, R. Kariv
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Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is common and a leading cause of cancer-related death, which develops gradually from adenomatous and serrated polyps. Established dietary risk factors for CRC include high intake of red and processed meat, alcohol and calorie-dense foods, and low intake of plant-based foods. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet has been associated with lower risk of CRC in observational population studies. Its anti-neoplastic properties are attributed to a high fiber plant-based diet, low in calorie-dense foods, and high in fish over red meat intake. However, the association between the Mediterranean diet individual and combined components, and advanced colorectal polyps is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the association between the Mediterranean diet individual and combined components, and advanced colorectal polyps (advanced adenoma and serrated adenoma) in a population based case-control study.