535P - High flow nasal cannula oxygen for respiratory failure in patients with airway obstruction due to primary lung cancer

Date 18 December 2016
Event ESMO Asia 2016 Congress
Session Poster lunch
Topics Thoracic Malignancies
Presenter Tina Kamei
Citation Annals of Oncology (2016) 27 (suppl_9): ix170-ix176. 10.1093/annonc/mdw599
Authors T. Kamei1, Y. Okuma1, R. Sone2, M. Nagamata1, Y. Hosomi1
  • 1Thoracic Oncology And Respiratory Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome Hospital, 113-0021 - Tokyo/JP
  • 2Clinical Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome Hospital, 113-0021 - Tokyo/JP

Abstract

Background

Airway obstruction due to primary lung cancer can sometimes lead to severe respiratory failure. Therefore, advancing the treatment of respiratory failure is essential for improving the outcome of patients with lung cancer. High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is a new treatment device supplying a high flow of heated and humidified oxygen via a nasal cannula. Some studies reported the potential application of HFNC oxygen therapy for respiratory failure in do-not-intubate patients with solid tumors.

Methods

From September 2012 to May 2016, 437 patients with respiratory failure were treated with HFNC oxygen therapy at our institute. Among them, we identified four patients with airway obstruction due to primary lung cancer and retrospectively reviewed their medical records.

Results

HFNC oxygen therapy improved oxygenation in all patients with acute respiratory failure; therefore, they could accomplish radiation therapy for relieving airway obstruction. Two patients received a dose of 60 Gy/30 Fr, one a dose of 30 Gy/10 Fr and the other a dose of 20 Gy/5 Fr. The duration of HFNC oxygen therapy ranged from 6 to 13 days. Two patients had an improved performance status of up 2 points. Three patients were eventually discharged without oxygen supply and subsequently treated with chemotherapy. One patient died 29 days after palliative radiotherapy because of tumor progression.

Conclusions

HFNC oxygen therapy can treat severe respiratory failure due to primary lung cancer airway obstruction, allowing patients to undergo radiotherapy. If this is successful, additional treatments can then be administered.

Clinical trial indentification

none

Legal entity responsible for the study

Tina Kamei

Funding

N/A

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.