Pilot Study of Anxiety, Depression, and Quality of Life in Patients with the Diagnosis of Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

Date 22 October 2018
Event ESMO 2018 Congress
Session Poster display session: Breast cancer - early stage, locally advanced & metastatic, CNS tumours, Developmental therapeutics, Genitourinary tumours - prostate & non-prostate, Palliative care, Psycho-oncology, Public health policy, Sarcoma, Supportive care
Topics Melanoma
Psychosocial Aspects of Cancer
Presenter Regine Nshimiyimana
Citation Annals of Oncology (2018) 29 (suppl_8): viii557-viii561. 10.1093/annonc/mdy296
Authors R. Nshimiyimana1, C.E. Guzzetta2, M. Brown3, Q. Zhou4, J.M. Johnson1, T. Sato5, S. Keith6
  • 1Medical Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center-Thomas Jefferson University, 19107 - Philadelphia/US
  • 2School Of Nursing, The George Washington University, 20006 - Washington DC/US
  • 3Nursing, MedStar Health, 21044 - Columbia/US
  • 4School Of Nursing, Virginia Science And Technology Campus, The George Washington University, 20147 - Ashburn/US
  • 5Medical Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center-Thomas Jefferson University, 19101 - Philadelphia/US
  • 6Biostatistics, Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson Health, 19101 - Philadelphia/US

Abstract

Background

Awareness of a patient’s anxiety, depression, and quality of life (QOL) in those with metastatic uveal melanoma (MUM) can influence care that meets patients’ bio-psycho-social-spiritual needs. Objectives: To measure the level of anxiety, depression, and QOL in MUM patients and explore differences by gender, age range, time to metastatic disease, and duration of illness since metastasis.

Methods

We used a descriptive-comparative design. From 9/1/2017 - 12/1/ 2017, a convenience sample of 70 MUM patients aged ≥ 18 years, treated at a Mid-Atlantic hospital were invited to complete a combined survey of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF.

Results

There were 65 respondents (93% response rate). 30.8% (n = 20) had at least borderline anxiety, 13.8% (n = 9) had at least borderline depression, and 32.3% (n = 21) had a decrease in global QOL. Patients aged 18 to ≤ 60 years had a significantly higher anxiety score (7.52 ± 3.65; p = 0.003) and lower QOL in environmental health (32.48 ± 5.23; p = 0.006). There was a significant difference in anxiety scores by the duration of illness since metastasis (< 1 year [7.79 ± 3.72], >1 year to < 5 years [5.75 ± 3.45], > 5 years [3.70 ± 2.79]; p = 0.01). No differences were found by gender or time to metastatic disease.

Conclusions

Up to 30% of participants had at least borderline anxiety and a decreased global QOL while up to 10% had at least borderline depression. These findings support the integration of bio-psycho-social-spiritual practices in the care of MUM patients.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

Regine Nshimiyimana.

Funding

Has not received any funding.

Editorial Acknowledgement

Cathie E Guzzetta, PhD, RN, FAAN Mary-Michael Brown, DNP, RN Qiuping Zhou, PhD, RN Jennifer M. Johnson, MD, PhD, FACP Takami Sato, MD, PhD Scott W. Keith, PhD.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.