268P - Survival patterns of high-grade breast cancer patients in the United States

Date 10 October 2016
Event ESMO 2016 Congress
Session Poster display
Topics Breast Cancer, Metastatic
Presenter Mohammed Mousa
Citation Annals of Oncology (2016) 27 (6): 68-99. 10.1093/annonc/mdw365
Authors M. Mousa1, A. Meshref1, M. Ramadan1, M.Y. Haggag2
  • 1Faculty Of Medicine, Suez Canal University, 41522 - Ismailia/EG
  • 2Faculty Of Medicine, Suez Canal University, 42524 - Ismailia/EG

Abstract

Background

Our study aimed at evaluation of relative survival rates of patients with high-grade breast in the United States diagnosed in 2010 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registry.

Methods

We used Kaplan-Meir method to analyze the 2-year relative survival rates of 14283 Bloom-Richardson grade III breast cancer patients using SEER*Stat Program. We used Z-test to compare relative survival rates among patients' groups categorized by radiation therapy status, age groups, race, site, histology, Her2/Hormone Receptors (HR) status, and laterality using Z–test. We used Kaplan-Meir method to analyze the 2-year relative survival rates of 14283 Bloom-Richardson grade III breast cancer patients using SEER*Stat Program. We used Z-test to compare relative survival rates among patients' groups categorized by radiation therapy status, age groups, race, site, histology, Her2/Hormone Receptors (HR) status, and laterality using Z–test.

Results

There was a statistically significant increase in the 2-year relative survival rate for patients who received radiation therapy (96.8 ± 0.3%) in comparison to patients who did not receive it (89.3 ± 0.4%, P 

Conclusions

Radiation therapy, patient's age, race, site, histology, Her2/HR status can affect the relative survival rates in high-grade breast cancer cases while laterality seems to have no effect on relative survival in such cases. These findings can be used in designing better disease surveillance and prognostic counseling programs.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

American National Cancer Institute, The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program

Funding

None

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.