Chapter 1 – Epidemiology, pathogenesis and risk factors

Clinical features and survival expectancy

Clinical features and survival expectancy 1

Siegel R, et al. Ca Cancer J Clin 2019;69:7-34

Around only 15% of all lung cancer cases are diagnosed at an early stage, with a 5-year survival rate >50%.

In a large percentage of cases, lung cancer is diagnosed at an advanced stage with distant metastases and a 5-year survival rate of about 5%.

The 5-year survival rate for all lung cancer stages combined is about 18%.

Clinical features and survival expectancy 2

Dela Cruz CS, et al. Clin Chest Med 2011;32:605-644

Lung cancer in both sexes is predominantly diagnosed in the elderly population (median age at diagnosis is 71 years).

Compared with men, women are less likely to have a smoking history, are generally younger at the time of diagnosis, and have a better survival expectancy at any stage, independent of the therapeutic approach.

Lung adenocarcinoma is the most common histological subtype among women.

Adenocarcinoma accounts for 38.5% of all lung cancer cases, while squamous cell carcinoma and large cell carcinoma account for 20.0% and 2.9%, respectively.

Over the past decades, adenocarcinoma incidence has progressively increased, and it has now replaced squamous cell carcinoma as the most prevalent non-small cell lung cancer histotype.

Clinical features and survival expectancy 3

Dela Cruz CS, et al. Clin Chest Med 2011;32:605-644

Lung adenocarcinoma is also the most represented histotype among never-smokers.

Revision Questions

  1. What is the proportion of patients with lung cancer diagnosed at early stage of disease?
  2. Is there a correlation between a clinical characteristic (such as female gender or smoking attitude) and one specific histotype?
  3. Is the subtype histology prevalence the same compared with 30 years ago?

« Previous Page Next Page »

Last update: 12 June 2019