1658P - Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy; towards clinical application in breast cancer

Date 30 September 2012
Event ESMO Congress 2012
Session Poster presentation II
Topics Breast Cancer
Translational Research
Presenter Theo Ruers
Authors T. Ruers1, D. Evers2, R. Nachabé3, M.J. Vranken Peeters1, J. van der Hage1, H. Oldenburg1, E. Rutgers1, G. Lucassen3, B. Hendriks3, J. Wesseling4
  • 1Surgery, The Netherlands Cancer Institute Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, 1066 CX - Amsterdam/NL
  • 2The Netherlands Cancer Institute Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, 1066 CX - Amsterdam/NL
  • 3Minimally Invasive Healthcare, Philips Research, Eindhoven/NL
  • 4Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, 1066 CX - Amsterdam/NL

Abstract

Background

Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a promising new technique for breast cancer diagnosis. During DRS tissue is illuminated by a selected light spectrum. By specific absorption and scattering characteristics of the tissue an ‘optical fingerprint’ is obtained which represents specific morphological information. In this way DRS is able to differentiate normal tissue from tumor tissue. Here we compared the diagnostic accuracy of DRS in a cohort of patients and each patient individually to the pathology analysis of normal and malignant breast tissue.

Methods

Breast tissue from 47 female patients was analysed ex-vivo by DRS. A total of 1073 optical spectra were collected from fat, glandular tissue and fibroadenoma lesions as well as from (pre)-malignant tissue samples. These spectra were analyzed for each patient individually as well as for all patients collectively. Results were compared to the pathology analysis of biopsies from each measurement location.

Results

Collective patient data analysis for discrimination between normal and malignant breast tissue resulted in a sensitivity of 90%, a specificity of 88% and an overall accuracy of 89%. For individual analysis all measurements per patient were categorized as either benign or malignant. The discriminative accuracy of this individual analysis was nearly 100%. When an arbitrary threshold was used of a 90% agreement between all DRS measurements and the pathology analysis for each individual patient to ascertain a diagnosis, only in one patient the diagnosis was classified as uncertain.

Conclusions

Our results demonstrate that diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can be considered as an important new optical sensing technique that could improve the diagnostic workflow in breast cancer.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.