1350P - Family caregivers' awareness of illness and attitude toward disclosure during chemotherapy for advanced cancer

Date 28 September 2014
Event ESMO 2014
Session Poster Display session
Topics Palliative and Supportive Care
Presenter Sang Ho Byun
Citation Annals of Oncology (2014) 25 (suppl_4): iv471-iv477. 10.1093/annonc/mdu350
Authors S.H. Byun1, S. Kim1, Y. Ko1, S.Y. Kwon2, J.H. Cheon3, D. Shin4, C.H. Kim4, S.H. Yang4, S. Cho5, I.I. Na4
  • 1Family Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 139-706 - Seoul/KR
  • 2Hospice And Palliative Care Team, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 139-706 - Seoul/KR
  • 3Family Medicine, Research, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 139-706 - Seoul/KR
  • 4Internal Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 139-706 - Seoul/KR
  • 55department Of Psychiatry, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 139-706 - Seoul/KR

Abstract

Aim

We investigated family caregivers’ awareness of disease status and attitude toward disclosure of disease progression compared with those of cancer patients and explored the potential association between family caregivers’ attitudes and patients’ Quality of Life (QOL).

Methods

We carried out a survey using self-administered questionnaires answered by pairs of family caregivers and patients diagnosed with advanced cancer (n = 136 pairs). To assess patients’ QOL, we used the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire.

Results

More than half of family caregivers (54%) did not have full knowledge of patients’ advanced stage and goal of therapy. Positive attitudes toward disclosure were less common in family caregivers than in patients (59.4% and 85.4%, respectively, p < 0.01). The family caregivers’ positive attitudes toward disclosure were inversely associated with patients’ low functional scores (emotion [p = 0.04], cognition [p = 0.02]) and high symptom scores (nausea and vomiting, pain, and insomnia, p-value < 0.05). However, in most QOL scales, patients’ attitudes were not significantly associated with functioning and symptom scores.

Conclusions

A large portion of family caregivers may not know patients’ exact status in Korea. This study also suggests that the family caregivers’ attitudes may differ from patients’ and may be associated with patients’ QOL.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.