30P - The beliefs, orientation, knowledge, understanding, attitudes and treatment access to lung cancer amongst rural men in Nigeria

Date 17 April 2015
Event ELCC 2015
Session Poster lunch
Topics Psychosocial Aspects of Cancer
Cancer Aetiology, Epidemiology, Prevention
Lung and other Thoracic Tumours
Patient Education
Presenter Malcolm Tagbarha
Citation Annals of Oncology (2015) 26 (suppl_1): 6-9. 10.1093/annonc/mdv044
Authors M.O. Tagbarha
  • Public Health, University of Abuja, 100009 - Abuja/NG

Abstract

Aim/Background

To ascertain the beliefs, orientation, knowledge, understanding, attitudes and treatment access to lung cancer among rural men in Nigeria.

Methods

An interview guide was designed specifically for these studies in which 1500 rural men in Nigeria most of which were age 35 and over took part in. It contained questions about beliefs, orientation, knowledge, understanding and attitudes about Lung Cancer Diagnosis and incidences. In addition, questions assessing the variables of the Health Belief Model and health motivations also were included. The data were obtained during face-to-face interviews in the primary language of the participating people. The interviews were translated into English.

Results

Out of the 1500 men who participated, only 10% of the participants knew about lung cancer, 5% had undergone at least one Lung Cancer Diagnosis during their lives, and 85% were not aware of the disease. There was little or no access to treatment even at early detection in these rural areas thereby causing vulnerability to loss of life. Majority of these men (95%) said they knew little or nothing about lung cancer. While 10% of the men said detecting cancer early was important, only 5% reported that cancer could be cured. Age, education, or mother tongue showed no statistically significant relationship with the lung health practice scores. However, proficiency with the English language (p = 0.009) and number of years exposed to awareness and education (p = 0.009) had a significant relationship with the lung health practice scores.

Conclusions

The level of awareness and treatment access to lung cancer amongst Nigeria's rural men is extremely low thereby making them not to engage in screening and/or detection practices. This alarming situation calls for urgent intervention of medical/health organizations to provide immediate lung cancer awareness, diagnosis and care so as to reduce incidences or threat at early detection. Tobacco which is known as a major cause of cancer (90%) is widely used by these rural men thereby making them so vulnerable. Awareness is suggested while providing smoking cessation for smokers who intend to quit.

Disclosure

The author has declared no conflicts of interest.