69P - The impact of genetic alteration on recurrence in patients with resected stage I non-small cell lung cancer

Date 17 April 2015
Event ELCC 2015
Session Poster lunch
Topics Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer, Early Stage
Translational Research
Presenter Hee Soon Chung
Citation Annals of Oncology (2015) 26 (suppl_1): 18-23. 10.1093/annonc/mdv048
Authors H.S. Chung1, E.Y. Heo2, S.S. Park2, Y.S. Park3, Y.W. Kim3, D.K. Kim2
  • 1Internal Medicine, Boramae Medical Center, 156-707 - Seoul/KR
  • 2Internal Medicine, Boramae Medical Center, Seoul/KR
  • 3Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul/KR

Abstract

Aim/Background

Lung cancer has been known to recur frequently even after complete surgical resection. The impact of genetic alteration on tumor recurrence, especially in early stage lung cancer, has been debated. The aim of this study is to find the effect of genetic alteration on recurrence in patients with resected early stage lung cancer.

Methods

The stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients who underwent surgical resection at Seoul National University Hospital between Jan 2007 and Dec 2011 were included. The time to lung cancer recurrence from the date of surgery was evaluated and hazard ratio (HR) for lung cancer recurrence was compared according to EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement using Cox proportional hazard model.

Results

Among a total of 410 patients, 181 patients (44.1%) had EGFR mutation and 10 patients (2.4%) had ALK rearrangement. During the follow-up period (median 38.1 months), lung cancers recurred in 89 patients (21.7%) and median time to recurrence was 19.1 months (range, 0.8-71.2). Among 181 patients who had EGFR mutation, lung cancers recurred in 38 patients (21.0%). Meanwhile, among 229 patients who didn't have EGFR mutation, lung cancers recurred in 51 patients (22.3%). Of 10 patients having ALK rearrangement, 3 patients (30.0%) had lung cancer recurrence. Among 230 patients who had not rearrangement, lung cancers recurred in 50 patients (21.7%). EGFR mutation (adjusted HR 1.08, p = 0.730) and ALK rearrangement (adjusted HR 1.01, p = 0.995) did not affect the risk of lung cancer recurrence. However, sublobar resection, lymphovascular invasion and larger tumor size increased the risk of lung cancer recurrence irrespective of genetic alteration.

Conclusions

The risk of recurrence in patients with resected early stage lung cancer was not significantly different according to genetic alterations such as EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.