P-063 - Clinical outcomes in patients with gastric cancer bleeding as initial presenting symptom

Date 04 July 2015
Event WorldGI 2015
Session Posters
Topics Gastric Cancer
Presenter Y.J. Kim
Citation Annals of Oncology (2015) 26 (suppl_4): 1-100. 10.1093/annonc/mdv233
Authors Y.J. Kim1, W.C. Chung1, K.-. Lee1, C.-. Paik2, H.J. Sung3
  • 1The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon-Si/KR
  • 2St. Vincent's Hospital, Suwon/KR
  • 3St. Vincent's Hospital, Suwon-Si/KR

Abstract

Introduction

Gastric cancer presenting with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding occurs in the late course of the disease. However, it is uncertain whether cancer bleeding predict poor prognosis. We aim to evaluate the clinical outcomes in patients with gastric cancer bleeding as initial presenting symptom.

Methods

A total 1,370 patients who were admitted as gastric cancer between January 2004 and December 2013 were enrolled. Among them, a consecutive series of patients who were admitted gastric cancer bleeding as initial presenting symptom were reviewed and a total 43 patients were enrolled. The control patients with gastric cancer were selected at a 3:1 ratio with age and sex matched.

Results

In 43 patients with gastric cancer bleeding, 24 patients had gastrectomy, whereas 1,005 patients had gastrectomy with curative intention (55.8% vs. 78.3%, P < 0.01). Male dominant pattern was typical in cancer bleeding (P < 0.01). On operative fields, gastrectomy was changed into palliative bypass surgery due to upgraded stage in 4 patients (4/28, 14.3%) with cancer bleeding, whereas 23 patients (23/1028, 2.2%) without cancer bleeding (P < 0.01). When the patients with cancer bleeding compared with age and sex matched patients, there were significant differences in disease free survival, progression free survival and overall survival.

Conclusion

In patients with gastric cancer bleeding, they had more advanced stage. Also, male was predominant and prognosis was poor. When patients with gastric cancer were initially presented with UGI bleeding, cancer stage could be under-estimated, and careful staging work-up should be needed.