1373P - Economic burden of costly cancer drugs in a healthcare service

Date 30 September 2012
Event ESMO Congress 2012
Session Poster presentation II
Topics Bioethics, Legal, and Economic Issues
Presenter Marcelo Blanco Villalba
Authors M. Blanco Villalba1, A. Pini2, G. Streich1, E. Molinas1, J.R. Puyol3, M.P. Bramajo1, E.J. Batagelj2
  • 1Oncology, Centro Medico Austral OMI, 1019 - Buenos Aires/AR
  • 2Centro Medico Austral OMI, 1019 - Buenos Aires/AR
  • 3Oncologia, Centro Medico Austral OMI, 1019 - Buenos Aires/AR

Abstract

Background

The equitable access to medical treatment accordingly to individual needs is an important issue to discuss taking into account that resources are limited. In this study we describe the incidence of costly cancer drugs in a healthcare service with 200000 affiliates from Buenos Aires city, from January 2010 to December 2011 and compare both years. We also calculate the total annual cost of expensive drug treatment and identify the highest cost drugs used.

Material and methods

Retrospective study Source: clinical history and files from patients on anticancer treatment from January 2010 to December 2011 and drug costs information from the accounting department.

Results

During the year 2010, 3% of the total cancer patients (906) received costly cancer treatment. The most used therapies were: Rituximab (39.2%), Trastuzumab (25%). Bevacizumab (10%).The total annual cost was $ 563188 of which 37.7% was for breast cancer, 30.3 % was for haematological cancer and 20.17% was for colorectal cancer. The mean annual cost per patient was $20113. During the year 2011, 4, 5% of the total cancer patients (1135) received costly cancer treatment. The most used therapies were: Trastuzumab (54%).Rituximab (18%), Bevacizumab (8%).The total annual cost was $947873 of which 61.6% was for breast cancer, 13.3 % was for haematological cancer and 8.78% was for colorectal cancer. The mean annual cost per patient was $18957.

Conclusion

The results of this analysis provide useful information to health care providers and decision makers in understanding the economic burden of cancer. Additionally, this cost information will greatly assist in determining the cost-effectiveness of new technologies and early detection systems. In order to warrant adequate access to these expensive treatments we need to generate a model of health coverage enhancing participation of all parts.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.