1576P - Body mass index (BMI), lifestyle behaviors, and perceptions in cancer survivors.

Date 10 September 2017
Event ESMO 2017 Congress
Session Poster display session
Topics Cancer Aetiology, Epidemiology, Prevention
Presenter Lawson Eng
Citation Annals of Oncology (2017) 28 (suppl_5): v543-v567. 10.1093/annonc/mdx388
Authors L. Eng1, S. Su2, D. Pringle3, M. Mahler3, C. Niu3, H. Naik4, R. Mohan3, K. Tiessen3, H. Hon3, C.M. Brown5, J.M. Jones1, D. Howell6, P. Selby7, S. Alibhai8, W. Xu9, G. Liu3
  • 1Department Of Medical Oncology And Hematology, Princess Margaret Hospital, M5G 2M9 - Toronto/CA
  • 2Department Of Biostatistics, Ontario Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics, Ontario Cancer Institute, M5N 2P3 - Toronto/CA
  • 3Department Of Medical Oncology And Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, M5G 2M9 - Toronto/CA
  • 4Department Of Medicine, University of British Columbia, vencouver/CA
  • 5Department Of Medical Oncology And Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto/CA
  • 6Palliative Care And Psychosocial Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, M5G 2M9 - Toronto/CA
  • 7Addictions, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, M6J 1H4 - Toronto/CA
  • 8Geriatrics And General Internal Medicine, Toronto General Hospital, M5G 2M9 - Toronto/CA
  • 9Department Of Biostatistics, Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto/CA

Abstract

Background

Obesity is associated with poorer outcomes across multiple cancer types. Lifestyle behaviours (smoking, physical activity (PA) and alcohol) can improve outcomes among cancer survivors.

Methods

Cancer patients of all subtypes were cross-sectionally surveyed on their smoking, alcohol and PA levels, and their perceptions of these behaviours on quality of life (QoL), fatigue and survival (OS). Multivariable logistic regression models evaluated the association of BMI 1 year prior to diagnosis with behaviour changes and perceptions.

Results

Of 1269 patients, 205 smoked at diagnosis and 44% quit at 1 year; 350 (at diagnosis) and 238 (at follow-up) met PA guidelines; 661 drank alcohol at diagnosis while 50% reduced consumption after. Median BMI was 25.8 (22% obese); 75%+ patients perceived PA as improving QoL and OS, while 70%+ described smoking and 55%+ described alcohol as worsening QoL and OS. At diagnosis, increased BMI was associated with ex-smoking (vs current smoking; P = 0.003), never using alcohol (vs former use; P = 0.05) and not meeting PA guidelines (P = 0.01). Among smokers at diagnosis, increased BMI was associated with smoking cessation (aOR = 1.08 per 1 unit BMI, P = 0.03) and perceptions that smoking worsens OS (aOR = 1.10, P = 0.04) and fatigue (aOR = 1.08, P = 0.08). Among those not meeting PA guidelines at diagnosis, increased BMI was associated with perceptions that PA worsens fatigue (OR = 1.02, P = 0.06) and is unsafe (OR = 1.04, P = 0.06), but were not associated with PA levels changes after diagnosis. Among drinkers at diagnosis, increased BMI was associated with perceiving alcohol to be less harmful (aOR = 0.93, P = 0.002) and less likely to worsen OS (aOR = 0.96, P = 0.04) and fatigue (aOR = 0.97, P = 0.09), but not with alcohol use changes after diagnosis. BMI was not associated with counselling rates; however, 66% of current smokers received cessation counselling while only 14% of current drinkers and 13% of those not meeting PA guidelines received counselling on their respective behaviours.

Conclusions

Obese patients were more likely to quit smoking and perceive it to be harmful but less likely to perceive alcohol as harmful. Survivorship programs should consider focusing on PA and alcohol counselling in obese patients.

Clinical trial identification

Legal entity responsible for the study

Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

Funding

None

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.