1669P - Onco-I2B2 project: a bioinformatics tool integrating -OMICs and clinical data to support translational research

Date 30 September 2012
Event ESMO Congress 2012
Session Poster presentation II
Topics Translational Research
Presenter Alberto Zambelli
Authors A. Zambelli1, D. Segagni2, V. Tibollo2, A. Dagliati2, A. Malovini2, V. Fotia1, S. Manera1, R. Bellazzi3
  • 1Oncology, Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 - Pavia/IT
  • 2Information Technology, Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 - Pavia/IT
  • 3Industrial And Information Engineering, University of Pavia, Pavia/IT

Abstract

The ONCO-i2b2 project, supported by the University of Pavia and the Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri (FSM), aims at supporting translational research in oncology and exploits the software solutions implemented by the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) research centre, an initiative funded by the NIH Roadmap National Centres for Biomedical Computing. The ONCO-i2b2 software is designed to integrate the i2b2 infrastructure with the FSM hospital information system and the Bruno Boerci Biobank, in order to provide well-characterized cancer specimens along with an accurate patients clinical data-base. The i2b2 infrastructure provides a web-based access to all the electronic medical records of cancer patients, and allow researchers analyzing the vast amount of biological and clinical information, relying on a user-friendly interface. Data coming from multiple sources are integrated and jointly queried.

In 2011 at AIOM Meeting we reported the preliminary experience of the ONCO-i2b2 project, now we're able to present the up and running platform and the extended data set. Currently, more than 4400 specimens are stored and more than 600 of breast cancer patients give the consent for the use of specimens in the context of clinical research, in addition, more than 5000 histological reports are stored in order to integrate clinical data.

Within the ONCO-i2b2 project is possible to query and merge data regarding:

• Anonymous patient personal data;

• Diagnosis and therapy ICD9-CM subset from the hospital information system;

• Histological data (tumour SNOMED and TNM codes) and receptor profile testing (Her2, Ki67) from anatomic pathology database;

• Specimen molecular characteristics (DNA, RNA, blood, plasma and cancer tissues) from the Bruno Boerci biobank management system.

The research infrastructure will be completed by the development of new set of components designed to enhance the ability of an i2b2 hive to utilize data generated by NGS technology, providing a mechanism to apply custom genomic annotations. The translational tool created at FSM is a concrete example regarding how the integration of different information from heterogeneous sources could bring scientific research closer to understand the nature of disease itself and to create novel diagnostics through handy interfaces.

Disclosure

All authors have declared no conflicts of interest.