ESMO E-Learning: Important Pathways to Target in (Advanced) NSCLC: A Focus on ALK, EGFR-Inhibition and Anti-Angiogenesis and their Implications for Clinical Practice

Learning Objectives

  • To provide an update on pathways important for targeted treatments in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer 
  • To provide a specific focus on the role of ALK inhibition, EGFR inhibition and anti-Angiogenesis in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer
  • To provide an update on clinical implications of targeting important molecular pathways in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

After two years E-Learning modules are no longer considered current. There is therefore no CME test associated with this E-Learning module.

Title Duration Content CME Points CME Test
Important Pathways to Target in (Advanced) NSCLC: A Focus on ALK, EGFR-Inhibition and Anti-Angiogenesis and their Implications for Clinical Practice 64 min. 105 slides 1 Take Test
Floriana Morgillo
Floriana Morgillo
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Morena Fasano
Morena Fasano
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In patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), various combinations of cytotoxic drugs have not improved treatment results beyond what has been observed with platinum doublets. In contrast, a major progress in the understanding of cancer biology and the mechanism of oncogenesis has allowed the development of molecular targeted therapies, that block dysregulated signalling pathways and molecular processes that characterise the lung cancer cells.

In past years, considerable efforts were made in order to identify new biological agents which may safely and effectively be administered to patients with advanced NSCLC. The following cancer cell pathways, in particular, have been exploited: the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) pathways, as well as targeting anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK).

In addition, novel targeted therapies that interfere with other dysregulated pathways in lung cancer are already in the clinic for some other diseases and are promising for molecularly defined subsets of NSCLC. Furthermore, the exploration of targeting possibilities interfering with some other pathways, especially in the immunotherapy arena, is under intensive research.

Although a shift towards curative setting is still to be seen, targeted therapies achieve a longer disease control in patients with advanced NSCLC. In addition, better toxicity profile than conventional chemotherapy, better target selectivity, availability for chronic treatment and, in some cases, oral administration have marked targeted compounds in this field.

This E-learning module outlines the therapeutic possibilities from targeting important pathways in advanced NSCLC and the most promising research approaches, discussed according to the specific molecular pathway targeted.

In their module, the authors cover oncogenic drivers, single-driver mutations, EGFR inhibitors, ALK inhibition, agents targeting the VEGF pathway, and novelties in NSCLC squamous histology.

This E-Learning module was published in 2015 and expired in 2017.

Last update: 14 April 2015

The authors have reported no conflicts of interest.